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The flexibility of EPA’s proposed Clean Power Plans allows for many potential pathways to compliance, and state consumer advocates now have a roadmap to navigate their decision-making process. Synapse today published a report on behalf of the National Association for State Utility Consumer Advocates (NASUCA) that will help consumer advocates work with other state agencies and stakeholders to develop a compliance plan that not only meets EPA’s emissions targets but protects consumers from shouldering the burden of excessive implementation costs.

The EPA’s proposed Clean Power Plan allows states the flexibility to collaborate with each other to develop plans on a multi-state basis to meet compliance targets. State agencies and advocates examining such opportunities for cooperation can use Synapse’s Clean Power Planning Tool (CP3T), now with multi-state functionality, to analyze the challenges and opportunities associated with regional compliance.

Dr. Elizabeth A. Stanton presented on the impact of EPA's Clean Power Plan to consumers at the NASUCA 2014 Annual Meeting in San Francisco last week. She was joined by Synapse CEO Bruce Biewald (second from right) in presenting Implications of EPA’s Proposed “Clean Power Plan”: Analyzing Consumer Impacts of the Draft Rule, a Synapse report that will serve as a common resource to help NASUCA’s members think through a broad range of potential implications of various compliance approaches to their respective consumers.

When the Clean Power Plan was announced in June 2014, EPA issued proposed carbon reduction goals using a rate approach (pounds of CO2 per MWh of electricity generation), but indicated that states would have the option to convert these rate-based targets to mass-based targets (pounds of CO2). Yesterday, EPA released further guidance on how states might translate the rate-based goals to mass-based equivalents.

Will potential new EPA ozone restrictions have devastating effects on the U.S. economy? That’s the claim made by a recent NERA Economic Consulting study. Cautioning media outlets to think and write critically about such claims, Media Matters for America published an article citing experts—including Synapse senior economist Frank Ackerman—who enumerated the methodological faults of the study.

Today the EPA released AVERT (Avoided Emissions and Generation Tool), an open-access tool built by Synapse to allow states and other stakeholders to estimate the hourly emissions benefits of energy efficiency and renewable energy policies and programs. AVERT allows non-expert users to measure emissions of CO2, SO2, and NOX mitigated by state or multi-state programs.

AVERT

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